MEDICA 2014: FETAL SOUND DETECTION MADE EASIER FOR MOTHERS WITH HIGH BMI

Huntleigh
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Huntleigh is offering a new generation of transducers that increase the efficiency of their dopplers.

High Body Mass Index is becoming increasingly common, which requires medical device manufacturers to adapt their products to this growing category. At Medica 2014, Huntleigh was presenting an evolution of its SonicAid Doppler, which could make pregnancy easier for the high risk population of mothers with a high BMI.

“Most dopplers are not able to detect fetal sounds when BMI is superior to 30 or 35,” explains David Stanger, Global Business Manager, Obstetric Systems, Huntleigh. “We have developed and patented a technology based on next-generation transducers which could raise this level to 60. That could mean doubling the BMI level, allowing the detection of fetal sounds without intervention.”

Another interesting development at Huntleigh is their SonicAid Freedom. This wireless add-on to their fetal monitoring platform intends to “demedicalize pregnancy, by imposing less devices on the mother,” says David Stanger. It is made of a small base that is put on a top of the platform with communication systems linked to wireless transducers.

The SonicAid Freedom therefore provides much more liberty to the pregnant mother. By being physically disconnected, she can move as far as 100 meters (within line of sight) from the monitoring platform and can take a bath since the wireless transducers are waterproof.

MEDICA 2014: FETAL SOUND DETECTION MADE EASIER FOR MOTHERS WITH HIGH BMI